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Olivia

Olivia in the snow

Olivia has faced some hard times in her long life (we think she’s about 10 years old). As a “pet” goat living with a family she was abandoned when their house burned down. (While we feel bad for the family’s loss, leaving your beloved goat behind in the hands of someone who sporadically would stop by with food is not a good plan.)

Olivia spent an estimated 3 months living in the backyard of the abandoned home. Olivia’s water source became whatever puddles resulted from rain, and without proper care, Olivia became infested with internal parasites causing her to lose weight.

The worst part was her hoof neglect. Domesticated goats must have their hooves trimmed because unlike wild goats, they’re not jumping around on mountains and rocks and keeping them warn down. Olivia’s hooves grew out like Turkish slippers, and this caused the ligaments in her legs to deform making it difficult to walk.  When Olivia was finally rescued by humane law and brought to the sanctuary, she was treated like a queen, and still is.

Her first farm friend was Dylan the calf, seen above when he was quite young.  Dylan is much bigger now, but frequently they still graze alongside each other.

Olivia prefers the company of humans to that of the other goats, so we try our best to get some socializing in every day — this includes playing tag with her horns (see a video).

Olivia has a growing fan base which include some website dedications, including this one by our hardworking volunteer/photographer Bob Esposito, which features the many faces of Olivia.

Olivia is sure to warm your heart with her slightly dysfunctional social manners.

Jumping for joy!

Jumping for joy!

Snow bunny

Snow Bunny

An older and bigger Dylan telling one of his notoriously off-color jokes.

An older and bigger Dylan telling one of his notoriously off-color jokes.

She has even been the subject of artwork, including this piece featured in our Art Auction, by JT Yost. A limited edition of prints is available and half the proceeds go to our hospice Building find.

She has even been the subject of artwork, including this piece  by JT Yost.